Wednesday, 11 November 2015

Mr. Armstrong

Emerald Ash Borer - Photo courtesy of David Cappaert, Michigan State UniversityIn Ontario, millions of ash trees are being killed every year by an non-native invasive species, the Emerald Ash Borer. The nasty little insect feeds under the bark of ash trees, and when the eggs hatch, the larvae get inside the bark and disrupt the circulation of water and nutrients of the tree. The presence of just a few insects in the tree can kill it.

There is a chemical treatment available that will kill the insect, but often the borer has done the damage to the tree before it becomes apparent.

It was too late for the young ash tree in front of my house. This summer it produced hardly any leaves, and tell-tale holes appeared in the bark, indicating the Emerald Ash Borer was at work. So it had to go.

After cutting, the whole tree, trunk, branches, sticks, has to be disposed of safely, making sure the nasty bug isn't spread to any other healthy trees. The stump was taken away, and a surprisingly small hole was left in the grass.


Within half an hour, the digger was back with a young tree, It's an Armstrong Maple. It will be tall, and not very wide, and the leaves turn red in the fall, just what I wanted.  It took just two minutes to plant, and you can see it here. OlderSon and Callum arrived in time to witness the happy event.



All new family members should have a name, so Callum has christened my tree Mr. Armstrong.

13 comments:

Marie Pretty Smith said...

Delivery and christening all in one day. Well done!🙂

Jono said...

The emerald ash borers are south of us. So far. The climate up here is still too harsh, but things are changing.

Suldog said...

I love that you replaced the tree with another. Good job!

Elephant's Child said...

I think the loss of a tree is always a tragedy. Love that the hole has a new, named, inhabitant so soon.

Ginnie said...

HELLO! I have always loved ash trees and can imagine the loss...remembering a similar disaster in the States to our elm trees not too long ago. (sigh) But having a red maple to replace it has got to feel fabulous. I'm smiling from ear to ear for you, especially after seeing the video. BRAVA.

sousca said...

It is sad to see a tree die, but worse if it is an old established tree. In the UK our ash trees come under threat from "Chalara dieback of ash", so called because of the fungus Chalara fraxinea that causes the disease.
Good luck to the new maple, I hope there are no nasties lurking that cause problems for maples.

Out on the prairie said...

I have a couple ash trees in my front yard. I love the shade and would hate to lose them. The chemical is not what I like to do, but it is necessary. Many parks have just cut them down.

Lowell said...

I like the name! What a shame, though. We've had similar problems with palms in southern Florida.

Anvilcloud said...

Too bad about the ash trees. We inoculated some in this town, but I don't know about the results.

EG CameraGirl said...

The Emerald Ash Borer is a nasty critter but hopefully the Armstrong Maple will be a great replacement.

Rock Chef said...

Can't go wrong with a Maple - I wish Mr Armstrong a long and happy life!

Sheila said...

The tree on the blvd in front of my house is very sickly. I wish they would remove it and replace it with a Maple. Maybe this year...?

madretz said...

That was fascinating! Loved watching the video. Though I'm very sorry about your ash tree.